Kifah Shah
Kifah Shah

Kifah Shah is MPower Change’s Digital Campaign Manager. She grew up in Southern California and has been organizing since she was 15. She has worked for the Asian Law Caucus, Clergy and Laity United for Economic Justice, Unite HERE! Local 11, and UC Berkeley’s Multicultural Community Center. Kifah also worked abroad in Europe at the Migration Policy Group on issues related in migration, as well as in Pakistan at the Aman Foundation/USAID on issues of health, education, and economic empowerment. She is currently a TED Resident and on the Board of Trustees for MSA West. Kifah holds a Masters in Public Administration (Economic Policy) from the London School of Economics and a Bachelor of Arts in Ethnic Studies from U.C. Berkeley.

#MyMuslimVote at ISNA

#MyMuslimVote at ISNA

The MPower Change team was in Houston, TX on Labor Day weekend for ISNA’s 55th Annual Convention!

We were all about getting out #MyMuslimVote. We did voter registration daily, and signed up many new partners to take the efforts to their own cities! 

 

If you stopped by our table, or took a walk around the bazaar, you would have seen hundreds of people wearing #MyMuslimVote buttons!

Our Executive Director Linda Sarsour reminded everyone about why this year is so important for Muslims. She also highlighted how now – more than ever – we need to stand on the side of the oppressed and stand for justice.

Our Organizing Director Ishraq Ali relayed the importance of building relational power with people in our mosques in order to effectively get out the Muslim Vote.

 

Our Organizing Manager Kifah Shah was everywhere during the convention – from our table, to the bazaar, to the sessions – reminding people to check their voter registration status, and signing up folks to bring #MyMuslimVote to their schools and centers.

Believers Bail Out

Right now, there are over 2 million incarcerated people in the United States, predominantly Black and Latinx. Almost half a million of these people are being held on pretrial bond (bail); cash bail penalizes poverty and reproduces racism. In 2015, nationwide the median bail was $10,000, while the median pre-incarceration annual income of people incarcerated was $15,000. Black people are twice as likely to be held pretrial as white people and Muslims in pretrial detention face an increased risk of victimization, surveillance and denial of religious freedom in the prison system due to anti-Muslim racism (Islamophobia).

Believers Bail Out is a community-led effort to bail out Muslims in pretrial incarceration as a form of zakat. By paying bond, Believers Bail Out restores the presumption of innocence before trial and enables recipients to remain free while fighting their cases. It is in our capacity, and our duty as Muslims to be a part of ending this cycle that criminalizes poverty and is inherently racist in nature.

Through an outpouring of community support and Zakat donations during the month of Ramadan, the Believers Bail Out campaign has already helped families reunite.

StopCVE in LA

On January 13, 2017, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) announced that the City of Los Angeles (Mayor’s Office of Public Safety) was set to receive funding under its Countering Violent Extremism (CVE) initiative. The City of Los Angeles would receive $400,000 for a program involving “Training and Engagement,” as well as $425,000 for “Managing Interventions.” According to DHS, the stated purpose of the CVE program was to “develop and expand efforts at the community level to counter violent extremist recruitment and radicalization to violence.”

​The #StopCVE coalition in Los Angeles—representing local non-profit, civil society, advocacy, and digital advocacy groups, alongside Muslim leadership from across LA—has been organizing opposition to CVE since April 2016. Though presented under a guise of public safety and community-based programming, CVE efforts in LA have been implemented with selective community engagement and buy-in. This “community engagement” continued despite unanimous opposition from civil rights groups and the majority of Muslim communities across five counties in Southern California.

Soon, the LA City Council will move to discuss disbursing federal funding amounting to , which targets Muslim communities in the city through activities conducted under the auspices of CVE.

Iftar in the Streets

Join us! Host or attend an #IftarInTheStreets event in your city:

Find an Event Near You       Host an Event

This year, it’s more important than ever to be unapologetic about what we stand for as Muslims: justice, community, and a fair society.

That’s why we’re bringing back our #IftarInTheStreets campaign—where we use the tradition of breaking bread together to publicly stand in solidarity with our (Muslim and non-Muslim ally) communities.

2018 has been a challenging year for Muslim communities in the U.S.—but we’ve stood up and faced each one of those challenges. That’s the spirit behind Iftar in the Streets—resistance and celebration of the things that bring us together.

If you’re ready to stand in solidarity with our communities by being “in the streets”—adhering to the Prophetic tradition of acting and speaking out loudly for justice, join us!

Find an Event Near You       Host an Event

Download our Event Planning Guide Here

Check out our Iftar in the Streets Event in NYC last year:

[arve url=”https://www.facebook.com/MPowerChange/videos/1324828857630656/” title=”#IftarInTheStreets NYC 2017″ description=”Iftar in the Streets NYC June 2017 video produced by Eid Films” duration=”5M” /]